The following was published in the tournament programme of the 2018 Bill Volk Celebration Golf Classic

Reflections from Dan Coholan:

Bill’s passion…

Bill’s middle name was passion. His genuine interest in people and in particular his clients always shone through. Bill had a knack of making you feel like a million bucks and that anything was possible. He had a way of throwing his whole body into a conversation…hands waving, pacing back and forth or vaulting around in his chair. Bill put everything into it, and you always knew exactly what he was thinking and you always felt energized after a “Bill” conversation or meeting.

Bill’s golf club at the office…Bill Smiling

Bill had a terrific sense of the sport of things…the adventure. Leaning by his desk in the office was an older looking golf club…maybe a nine iron. Bill would take the occasional glance at the club as if to check in on an old friend or maybe to say that while the details of a complicated deal being discussed were vital there were other important matters to contemplate as well. Once in a while Bill would take a stance holding the club…this always gave the impression that Bill was an ace golfer….something that if you knew Bill’s golf game you knew was a stretch!

Bill’s punctuality…

Bill and I worked on a lot of important client deals together which required us to travel often. I got into the habit of offering Bill a ride. So some early morning pick-ups at his front door would include a wake-up call, a briefing on where we were going and why and handing him his morning newspaper that was waiting on the driveway…sometimes getting Bill out the door and pointed took a bit of doing but it was always impressive how he could turn on a dime and roll into action.

Bill’s awesome client relationships…

Bill was a Managing Director of Mergers & Acquisitions. MD’s in M&A are known for superior intellect, top notch technical skills and unfailing stamina…Bill had all of that in spades. But Bill also had something extra…it was the Bill Volk factor. Bill could create extraordinary relationships with clients. No example is better than when RBC Capital Markets won a lead book running role along with Merrill Lynch and Morgan Stanley in the sale of $2.3 billion of common shares of TELUS owned by Verizon. Bill had forged a relationship with the Vice Chairman and CFO of Verizon many years earlier when Bill advised a company board. The relationship that Bill forged and grew over time gave RBC Capital markets a seat at the table to pitch for the business and win a leading role.

Reflections from Gord Bell:

Bill was a great mentor...

Over the years, Bill was fortunate to work on many interesting files, often with unique challenges. It gave him a good perspective on deals and clients. The younger bankers loved to work with Bill. He unfailingly took the time to transfer his extensive knowledge of M&A and banking to them. One could tell he loved that part of the job. Many of the younger bankers looked to Bill as a mentor and he gladly took on that role, giving them a long rope to work through issues and deals on their own but ensuring they were held to a high standard.

Bill called it like he saw it…

Bill in Suit and Tie

Sometimes in our business we need to deliver bad news or advice that clients don’t want to hear, because it’s the right thing to do. Bill was never shy about giving his perspective on a deal. Clients trusted Bill’s judgement so he was able to give that advice in a way that clients accepted, knowing he had the best interests of the company and shareholders in mind.

Reflections from Jan Sorhaug:

Bill on the call…

At work, Bill was always an incredibly cheerful and positive individual and someone who was loved by both his co-workers and his clients. Bill always enjoyed speaking to people and his days were often booked solid with conference calls. Bill was never much for worrying about what time it was...if a call was set to start at 11 a.m., he would often join the call at 11:15 a.m. or 11:30 a.m. because his previous call had run over the scheduled time. For most people, that would make it challenging to try to catch up on the topic of the conversation – but not for Bill – he was always, always able to insert himself into the call, however many minutes late, and “dive right into the topic” long enough to be late for his next call.